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Email: mh37@Drexel.edu

Internal Medicine

Pathway Directors

Janet Fitzpatrick, M.D. Office #
jhf32@drexel.edu (215) 762-7296
Kate Lewyckyj

kl35@drexel.edu

 

Arundathi Jayatilleke, M.D. Office #
aj475@drexel.edu (215) 762-2688
Heather Fertig hlf36@drexel.edu

 

Renee Amori, M.D. Office #
rea23@drexel.edu 215-762-5030

Drexel Fourth Year Discipline Based Pathway System

Pathway Director's Advice On Commonly Asked Questions

How important is it for a student to have completed some type of research to match in this specialty? When should the research be done? Does it have to be specialty specific?

Doing research is not necessary for a successful match in Internal Medicine Residency.  However, it is looked upon positively.  Some of the most competitive training programs do look for an applicant to have experience doing research.  Research is something that is often necessary when applying for the most competitive subspecialty fellowships in Internal Medicine, e.g. Cardiology, Gastroenterology.
Research does not have to be specialty specific.  There are many opportunities within the Department of Medicine at Drexel for students to get involved in Research.  The Pathway Director can steer you toward potential research mentors.

Are research opportunities available in your department?

Research opportunities may be available in our department. Contact the pathway advisor.

Are shadowing opportunities available?

Shadowing opportunities in Internal Medicine are available through the Internal Medicine Interest Group.  Opportunities range from observing procedures, to shadowing General Internal Medicine inpatient rounds, to shadowing General Internists in the ambulatory setting, to shadowing subspecialists during inpatient rounds or in the ambulatory setting.  Sign-up is done on-line via the Internal Medicine Interest Group.

Are away rotations essential to a successful match in your specialty?

Internal Medicine programs do not expect candidates to do rotations at their site in order to match at the program.  Away rotations can help students assess a site to determine if it is a good match for them.  In addition, strong performance at an away site can possibly help a student to get an interview at a program or even match in a program where they otherwise would not have.  However, students should be cautioned that it can work in the reverse as well.  You never know who your attending will be, whether it will be a good match for you, whether the rotation is a good one, etc.

What career opportunities exist after training?
Multiple career opportunities exist after training. One can choose to practice primary internal medicine in the office setting, as a hospitalist in the inpatient setting, or in any one of the medicine sub-specialties.
How would you describe the career-life balance for this specialty?

The career-life balance is variable depending on the chosen specialty and personal preference. Some can join a practice and choose to work part-time while raising a family. Others can choose a day job typically 8-5. There is also an option to do shift work as a hospitalist.

What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

The American College of Physicians is a good resource.

Are research opportunities available in your department?

Research opportunities may be available in our department. Contact the pathway advisor.

What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?

Students can join the Medicine Interest Group. Shadowing is the best way to explore this career.

What career opportunities exist after training?

Multiple career opportunities exist after training. One can choose to practice primary internal medicine in the office setting, as a hospitalist in the inpatient setting, or in any one of the medicine sub-specialties.

How would you describe the career-life balance for this specialty?
The career-life balance is variable depending on the chosen specialty and personal preference. Some can join a practice and choose to work part-time while raising a family. Other can choose a day job typically 8-5/ This is also an option to do shift work as a hospitalist.
What resources would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
The American College fo Physicians is a good resource.
What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
Students can join the Medicine Interest Group. Shadowing is the best way to explore this career.
What are the most important qualities of character traits for a person in this field?
It is important for internists to be organized and be detail oriented. It is necessary to have good communitication and listening skills.
Any other advice you wish to share?

Fourth year scheduling:

  • It is best to schedule the Medicine Subinternship in Blocks 1 or 2 of Fourth year so that your evaluation is part of your Residency application.  This rotation, as well as a letter of recommendation from your attending during this rotation, are valued by Internal Medicine Program Directors.  Subinternships in the Medical Intensive Care Unit are also valued in addition to the Medicine Subinternship or even in lieu of it if you are unable to get the Medicine Subinternship in the first couple of blocks.
  • Medicine electives are also advantageous if scheduled in the first few blocks.  These are rotations in which students are likely to have a good amount of face-to-face contact with attending and therefore lend themselves well for letters of recommendation.
Interview Timing:
  • Internal Medicine interview season usually begins slowly the second or third week of November for most programs. It peaks in December and the first couple of weeks of January.  The best block(s) to take off for interviewing are Block 6 or Block 7.

Go to the Drexel Careers Development Center for information on residency planning, match results, FREIDA (lists of residency training programs across the country) and more.

Drexel and Clinical Site Residency Programs

Drexel Medical Student Interest Group

Internal Medicine Interest Group: ducomimig@gmail.com

Specialty Description

A personal physician who provides long-term comprehensive care in the office and the hospital, managing both common and complex illness of adolescents, adults, and the elderly. Internists are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infections, and diseases affecting the heart, blood, kidneys, joints and digestive, respiratory, and vascular systems. They are also trained in the essentials of primary care internal medicine which incorporates an understanding of disease prevention, wellness, substance abuse, mental health, and effective treatment of common problems of the eyes, ears, skin, nervous system, and reproductive organs. (Source: The American Board of Medical Specialties. Guide to Physician Specialties. Evanston, IL: American Board of Medical Specialties; February 2008)

Time Requirement


The residency for general internal medicine is three years. To practice in an internal medicine subspecialty requires from one to three years of additional training.

Subspecialties

  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology
  • Allergy & Immunology
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism
  • Gastroenterology
  • Geriatric Medicine
  • Hematology
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine
  • Hospital Medicine, Focused Practice
  • Infectious Disease
  • Interventional Cardiology
  • Medical Oncology
  • Nephrology
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Rheumatology
  • Sleep Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
  • Transplant Hepatology

National Organizations

The national specialty organizations can provide medical students with excellent resources as well as updates on current activities within the field, conferences, and on-going research opportunities and research funding.

 

Residency Application and Match Info*

  National Statistic DUCoM
Average Application Count by Specialty (2017)** 31.6 41.2
Mean Number of programs ranked in matched specialty (2014-2016)*** 10.3 12.9
Application Services ERAS  
Matching Program

NRMP  
Drexel Match Data --2014 - 2015- 2016 - 2017 - 2018

*The number of applications and programs ranked will vary based on many factors. Students should seek advice from their Pathway Advisor and/or their Student Affairs Career Advisor in conjunction with the data above.
**Data drawn from ERAS data
*** Data drawn from NRMP Characterstics of Matched Seniors

AAMC - Careers in Medicine

General Information: Careers in Medicine
(Log in for more helpful data to include: Personal Characteristics / Match data / Residency Requirements / Workforce Statistics / Compensation)

Specialty Specific Opportunities

For external research, volunteering, educational, and other opportunities check the Career Advising Website pages on Research and Community, Educational, and Externship Opportunities. Most of these opportunities are summer programs however some are available throughout the year.