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Queen Lane Campus
2900 Queen Lane
1st Floor, Room 100
Phila., PA 19129
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& Friday 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.
215-991-8762
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Email: mhartman@DrexelMed.edu

Urology

There is currently no Urology Pathway:

Recommended Pathway is Surgery.   

Pathway Director
Drexel University College of Medicine
Michael S. Weingarten, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Professor of Surgery
Hahnemann University Hospital
Department of Surgery
245 N. 15th Street, Mail Stop 413
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Phone: (215) 762-7008
Fax: (215) 762-8699
e-mail: michael.weingarten@drexelmed.edu

Drexel Fourth Year Discipline Based Pathway System

“So you want to go into Urology”

This guide was written by Dr. Paulas Vyas, Class of 2013. Go to the Drexel Careers Development Center for information on residency planning, match results, FREIDA (lists of residency training programs across the country) and more.

Go to the Drexel Careers Development Center for information on residency planning, match results, FREIDA (lists of residency training programs across the country) and more.

Drexel Medical Student Interest Group

Specialty Description

Urology focuses on the medical and surgical treatment of the male genitourinary system, female urinary tract, and the adrenal gland. Urologists treat patients with kidney, ureter, bladder, prostate, urethra, and male genital structure disorders and injuries. They often coordinate care with nephrologists for patients with kidney disease and may perform kidney transplantations. Urologists may also investigate and treat infertility and male sexual dysfunction. Diagnostic procedures are very important for urologists. They use endoscopic, percutaneous, and open surgery to treat congenital and acquired disorders of the reproductive and urinary systems and related structures. These specialists see male and female patients of all ages and work in both hospital and clinic settings. Excellent surgical skills, manual dexterity, and good hand-eye coordination are important to this specialty.

Work
Patient Profile
5 most frequently encountered conditions
1. benign prostate disease
2. prostate cancer
3. kidney stones
4. urinary tract infections
5. sexual dysfunction
Setting
56% of physicians in this specialty practice in an urban setting:
office-based patient care
hospital-based physician staff
administration
5% of physicians in this specialty practice in a rural setting;
office-based patient care
hospital-based physician staff
administration
Lifestyle
Average hours worked per week
58.1

Salary
Clinical Practice

Low

Median

High

Starting salaries

$ 229,759

$ 240,000

$ 324,719

1‒2 years in specialty

$ 383,426

All physicians

$ 333,725

$ 420,516

$ 529,744

Academic Medicine

Low

Median

High

Assistant professor

$ 245,000

$ 286,000

$ 352,000

Associate/Full professor

$ 300,000

$ 377,000

$ 463,000

Time Requirement

Training consists of a minimum of five years of postgraduate education including one-two years in an ACGME-accredited general surgery training program and three-four years in a urology training program. There are 278 urology residency training positions available to U.S. seniors in 2012/2013.

Subspecialty/Fellowship Training

Subspecialty/fellowship training following completion of a urology residency training program is available in pediatric urology. Detailed information about the scope of this subspecialty training program, number of positions offered and length of training is available in the GMED online database FREIDA. FREIDA Career Information FREIDA physician workforce information for each specialty includes statistical information on the number of positions/programs for residency training, resident work hours, resident work environment and compensation, employment status upon completion of program and work environment for those entering practice in each specialty.

Competitiveness – HIGH – NRMP data not available
Urology has a separate matching program and is an early match – American Urology Association (AUA) Data:
There are 124 non-military accredited urology residency programs in the United States. (Military programs cannot participate due to government regulations regarding eligibility.) For 2013, 117 non-military accredited urology residency programs in the United States listed 279 positions with 279 vacancies being matched. 434 applicants submitted preference lists netting 155 unmatched applicants. Of U.S. senior medical students applying, 69% percent were matched.

National Organizations (The national specialty organizations can provide medical students with excellent resources as well as updates on current activities within the field, conferences, and on-going research opportunities and research funding.)

Go to the Drexel Careers Development Centerfor information on residency planning, match results, FREIDA (lists of residency training programs across the country) and more.

AAMC - Careers in Medicine

General Information: Careers in Medicine
(Log in for more helpful data to include: Personal Characteristics / Match data / Residency Requirements / Workforce Statistics / Compensation)

Specialty Specific Opportunities

For external research, volunteering, educational, and other opportunities check the Career Development Center's pages on Research and Community, Educational, and Externship Opportunities. Most of these opportunities are summer programs however some are available throughout the year.